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Book review: The Winter King, by Bernard Cornwell

This is the first book in a trilogy, The Warlord Chronicles, telling the story of Arthur. As Cornwell concedes in a pThis is the first book in a trilogy, The Warlord Chronicles, telling the story of Arthur. As Cornwell concedes in a postscript, we know very little about Arthur—his very historical existence is in doubt—so this is largely a work of imagination.

It is set in the Dark Ages, in the early years of the sixth century. The Romans left Britain a hundred years previously and now the Britons are fighting the invading Saxons. Unfortunately they are also fighting one another.This is the first book in a trilogy, The Warlord Chronicles, telling the story of Arthur. As Cornwell concedes in a postscript, we know very little about Arthur—his very historical existence is in doubt—so this is largely a work of imagination. [Read more]

Strange medical term in Casualty

In the last episode of 'Casualty' the surgeon Connie Beauchamp described a patient as suffering from cor pulmonale. She pronounced this in such an odd way, with the stress on the final 'e', that for a moment I didn't understand what she had said. The stress is normally on the 'a' (third syllable).

It isn't the first time that Connie has come up with odd things in this show. Some time ago, as I noted here, she told a patient to complain about her to the BMA - she should have said the GMC.

Andrew Marr traduces Thucydides

In 'Start the Week' today Andrew Marr referred to Thucydides, the Athenian historian, as 'the father of history' and also 'the father of lies'. This is incorrect; both these epithets have been applied to Herodotus, not Thucydides, who is regarded as a serious and reliable historian, still studied by academics today. But even Herodotus is now thought to be generally reliable and is our only source of knowledge for many features of the ancient world.